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Publication in Osteoarthritis & Cartilage

  • December 31, 2015

“Model-based evaluation of cost-effectiveness of nerve growth factor inhibitors in knee osteoarthritis: Impact of drug cost, toxicity, and means of administration” is an original research article examining the cost and toxicity thresholds under which a nerve growth factor inhibitor (NGF-i) would be a cost-effective treatment for knee OA patients. Given the high cost of drug administration in a hospital setting, we found that these agents are not cost-effective if they require intravenous hospital administration. However, if administration of the drug occurs at home and they are proven to have minimal effect on NGF-is could be a cost-effective treatment option

Publications in Osteoarthritis & Cartilage

  • November 30, 2015

“Cost-effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis in older patients with multiple comorbidities” was recently accepted at Osteoarthritis & Cartilage. In this manuscript, we used the OAPol Model to evaluate the long-term clinical and economic implications of using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or opioids in the treatment of knee OA patients who have multiple comorbid conditions, thereby increasing their risks for adverse events on both classes of analgesics. We found that, in this patient population, opioids lead to higher costs and reduced quality of life when compared to NSAIDs. In patients presenting with multiple comorbidities, naproxen- and ibuprofen-containing treatments are more effective in managing OA pain.

Publications in PLoS One

  • June 30, 2015

“Defining the value of future research to identify the preferred treatment of meniscal tear in the presence of knee osteoarthritis” is an original research article examining the long term clinical and economic outcomes of alternative treatment strategies for patients with concomitant mensical tear and knee osteoarthritis. We found that physical therapy alone is unlikely to be a cost-effective strategy and that, despite recent trials failing to show superiority of arthroscopic partial meniscetomy (APM), the current data do no support the rejection APM on a cost-effectiveness basis.

Publications in Arthritis Care & Research

  • February 28, 2015

“Lifetime medical costs of knee osteoarthritis management in the United States: impact of extending indications for total knee arthroplasty” is an original research article examining lifetime medical costs and TKA utilization under a range of eligibility criteria.  Using the OAPol Model, we found that medical costs attributable to knee OA are minor; however, this cost substantially increases as the eligibility for TKA expands.

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